Call: 705-932-MVAH (6824)

3 Queen Street, Millbrook, ON L0A 1G0
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MVAH Blog

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Construction Notice

Posted: 2018-04-17 Permanent Link
Construction Notice

Please see attached construction notice.

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Xylitol Poisoning

Posted: 2016-06-15 Permanent Link

Xylitol Poisoning in Dogs, Wait what is Xylitol?
How many packages of gum do you have lying around your house? You head to Costco and buy the multi-pack because it’s cheap and conveniently you can have one in your purse, one in your car, another lying on the counter etc. Now besides the obvious calorie issue would you have a chocolate bar in all the same places? Most people know that chocolate is toxic to dogs so they keep it out of reach, but a lot of us don’t know that xylitol, a sugar substitute in chewing gum is even more harmful to dogs at smaller doses. One piece of gum contains approximately 0.3 to 0.4 grams of xylitol so that means you could see toxic side effects in a 4.5 kg (10 lb dog) by as little as 1.5 pieces of gum. At smaller doses the first clinical signs you could see are weakness, vomiting, incoordination, tremors and potentially seizures. This is due to the hypoglycemic (low blood sugar) effect that xylitol causes in the body. At higher doses xylitol can cause hepatic necrosis (destruction of the liver) followed by acute liver failure which can then result in death. To see the more severe toxic effects the 10lb dog mentioned above would have to eat an entire pack of gum.
How many of us put peanut butter in Kong toys for our dogs? They love it right?! Well another significant fact is that xylitol is now being found in other products such as peanut butter so it is important to read the ingredients list. If you are going to take that extra step and actually brush your dog’s teeth it is important you use dog specific toothpaste because xylitol is found in human toothpastes due to its antibacterial qualities. Listed below are three links to articles that go into much more detail about xylitol toxicity in dogs.

Millbrook Valley Animal Hospital Pet Health Library Xylitol Poisoning
Type xylitol in Search Window
Xylitol The sugar-free sweetener your dog NEEDS you to know about

Or go to www.veterinarypartner.com and type “xylitol” in the search window.

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The Menace Among Us - Keeping you and your pet safe against TICKS this Fall!

Posted: 2015-09-22 Permanent Link

FEATURED STORY
Lyme Disease: Pets, Prevention and You.

It’s high time for ticks to strike in Canada, and incidents of Lyme disease are on the rise. Staying informed about ticks, knowing the risks and focusing on prevention can help keep your pet – and your family – safe from Lyme disease this season.

First, get to know their habitat; ticks love to dwell in wooded, grassy areas, especially thick underbrush. Some outdoor jobs and recreational activities, like landscaping, farming, hiking, hunting and fishing, can put you or your pet at a higher risk. When it comes to the transmission of Lyme disease, Ixodes scapularis, or “deer ticks”, are the usual suspects. Adult deer ticks are especially active in mid-to-late fall. These pests cannot jump or fly, but are skilled at latching onto a host at ground level and crawling upward to find exposed skin. And despite what many people think, dogs do not give Lyme disease to people; humans are at risk only if bitten by an infected tick.

While all Canadians are at risk for Lyme disease, eastern Canada has reported the highest rate of infection across the country. Lyme disease is often misdiagnosed, during the stage when it’s easiest to treat. Infection risk is present year-round, but be aware that you and your pet are most prone to Lyme disease from May through September. In addition, keep in mind that ticks are more than just a springtime hazard. If fall temperatures remain mild, ticks can peak again in October or November.1

In fact, certain species of ticks may display increased activity at different times throughout the spring, then again in the fall. In particular, a study from Ontario shows primarily I. scapularis ticks peaking first in the spring months, then a second time in November.2

Climate change is also projected to be a factor in the overall tick prevalence. It is speculated that in the next 80 years, the total area of land suitable for ticks and their hosts will increase by 68.9% in North America.3 In Canada, that number is estimated at a 212.9% increase.3 This means that warmer temperatures will invite an influx of ticks well into the fall months over a greater geographic area, creating an even more urgent need for vigilance and yearly pet vaccination.

To protect yourself from ticks, wear long pants and long-sleeved shirts, and tuck your pants into your socks. Wearing light coloured clothing makes ticks easier to see. It may also be helpful to walk with a partner who can watch for ticks on you or your pet. Try to stay on clear, unobstructed trails, and away from the fringe area between the woods and open land. Spraying an insect repellant on your body and clothing can also deter ticks however consult product caution statements before using, especially on young children. Immediately after being outside in tick-infested areas, check your clothes and body, as well as your pet’s body, for ticks. If you discover one or more ticks attached, proper removal is essential.

Most commonly, ticks can be removed using fine-pointed tweezers or a tick removal device, grasping the tick as close as possible to the skin surface, and pulling straight outward. Once the tick is out, it’s important to wash the bite with soap and water and treat it with an antiseptic.
If the tick that bit you or your pet is a Lyme-carrying species or if you are unsure, consult your doctor or veterinarian immediately. Symptoms of Lyme disease may not present right away, but early detection can aid in a successful treatment. If you experience headaches, body aches, fever or congestion, or notice your dog behaving differently, seek medical or veterinary care immediately. If left untreated, Lyme disease can cause irrevocable damage to the joints, nervous system and more.
Remember, Lyme disease cannot be easily cured – but it can be prevented. Stay informed, follow these simple steps for prevention, and ask your veterinarian about protecting your dog(s) from Lyme disease by starting them on a tick prevention.

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